Thursday, June 25, 2009

Just finished with this book, How Full Is Your Bucket?.

The Theory of the Dipper and the Bucket
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Each of us has an invisible bucket. It is constantly emptied or filled, depending on what others say or do to us. When our bucket is full, we feel great. When it's empty, we feel awful.
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Each of us also has an invisible dipper. When we use that dipper to fill other people's buckets -- by saying or doing things to increase their positive emotions -- we also fill our own bucket. But when we use that dipper to dip from others' buckets -- by saying or doing things that decrease their positive emotions -- we diminish ourselves.
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Like the cup that runneth over, a full bucket gives us a positive outlook and renewed energy. Every drop in that bucket makes us stronger and more optimistic.
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But an empty bucket poisons our outlook, saps our energy, and undermines our will. That's why every time someone dips from our bucket, it hurts us.
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So we face a choice every moment of every day: We can fill one another's buckets, or we can dip from them. It's an important choice -- one that profoundly influences our relationships, productivity, health, and happiness.

Saturday, June 20, 2009

Finally managed to upload some pics for momo's 3rd birthday... I was trying in vain to upload just these 3 pics for the last 2 days. Something is wrong with Blogger, but never mind since now it's working perfectly.

Every story will have a heading, right?

Initially I thought of leaving momo at home after dinner so that I can chop chop went to the neighbouring confectionery to get her a birthday cake but she was making a lot of noise at home so I have to take her along with me. She refused to eat her rice and climbing all over my table. Well, if it keeps on like that, I think I need to enrol her at the wall-climbing @ SAFRA. Who knows this lass might be going for the North Pole expenditure when she grows up, till then she can climb the world all she wants. Anything is possible, huh? Ops, I side-tracked too much.

Oh ok, so I took her along with me. Earlier on, when I fetched her from the childcare I already went to survey around to check which cake(s) is worth buying. Now everywhere birthday cakes got 20% discount. I figure this cake-shop should be ok so I went to straight with momo. I told her to choose which cake she want; the champagne or the durian one. She prefer the earlier one. I test her again. "You want the champagne or the green tea?" She still point her little finger to the champagne one. So that's the one for her. Sometimes you can't really take her words for it. I have been asking her "Today did you sleep?" "Today did you pee?" "Today did you poo-poo?" "Today did you eat your rice?" All she answer "got!" Yeah, you may be saying, oh, that is what she did at the childcare. But even if I asked her "Today did you beat your baby friends?", she said "got!" "then did your baby friends beat you?", she oso reply "got!" So.... you know, sometimes you can't really trust these 3 years old kids.

So the cake costs $16. I have to carry momo with my right arm and hold the cake with my left arm. Pretty tedious... But what to do, it's momo big day of the year.

Here, it is... Champagne cake. My mother was saying there are so many fruits in the centre, huh? Can't see the cake properly?


After doing away with the box, add on 3 candles and the happy birthday sign... it looks more like a birthday cake, right?


This is the long awaiting 3 year old momo. Can you imagine how tall is she now? I think she needs a train ticket to travel now. Can you see the deltoid muscle?
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There are many photos of momo but this is the only one I can post up here. Now momo is getting bigger and she needs to keep her privacy. But of cos' that doesn't restrict to momo's friends. Send me a request and I can forward you her pics.

Friday, June 19, 2009

Today, exactly 3 yrs ago, a little infant came into this world. So small, so fragile.
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Smaller than normal babies lying in the infant room.
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Got Jaundice longer than normal babies.
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Arrived to this world, crying.
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Now this little infant is a little lass. Talking non-stop sometimes, blabbering to herself and sometimes to us. Go around and touch things within and out of her reach. Likes to drink bubble tea with pearl, eat other ppl's food other than her own, eat at Mac and likes to drink iced milo, when I sleep she likes to sit on my tummy, etc.
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Happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy birthday to Alexandria, happy birthday to you...
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Just in case you doesn't know that her name is Alexandria.

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Finding Intrinsic, Lasting Motivation to Succeed by Denis Waitley
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For the high achiever, it's natural to seek out challenging goals because he or she has an inner, intrinsic drive to succeed. And success doesn't mean pet rocks, get-rich-quick schemes, lotto jackpots or chain letters. High achievers are looking not to receive, but to contribute, to give. They're looking for problems that are personally satisfying to solve. Bill Gates, Oprah Winfrey and Warren Buffett, three of the wealthiest individuals in the world, eagerly go to work every day to face the challenge of solving a new and bigger problem. All could be playing Backgammon on a tropical island or two rounds of golf per day.
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Since the accomplishment of a difficult task means more to the high achiever than any external motivation, it means that motivation will remain strong throughout his or her career. Think of how much stronger and more permanent such a motivation is compared to one that is extrinsic.
Suppose you choose a particular career because of the money. What happens when there's more money in doing something else? You're likely to abandon one path as soon as another possibility opens up, and eventually you'll find yourself wondering what you're really doing… maybe even who you really are.
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Since there is no inner drive to stay on any particular path, the journey will be arduous, and motivation will tend to weaken whenever the external reward seems remote or out of sight. This is especially true with individuals who want a home business with high rewards and minimal risk. Some people spend their entire lives wandering from one field to another, always looking for an easier way to find that pot of gold, never achieving a significant goal worthy of their inner potential.
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I've met many people who fit this description. If they're in sales, they move from company to company, from industry to industry, for one product or service to another. They are very hard to keep on your hand held electronic address book or in your directory of contacts because they are always either coming or going or starting another new business of their own. When that doesn't work, they get involved in sketchy enterprises, especially start-up-companies offering big, easy rewards, such as a wonder diet company where you can lose all the weight you want by eating anything you want and swallowing one amazing pill a day. They go from one Roman candle to another, from one "exciting opportunity" to another disappointment.
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The problem is, money alone does not stimulate intrinsic motivation and therefore is a means, not an end. Money is like fuel for your car. It is not the destination. It is not the journey. It is only part of the transportation system. Make your "why" grab you by your very soul. You'll never be disappointed for very long. And you'll stay committed regardless of "stock market gyrations" or setbacks.
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This week, find your unique "why" and pursue it with passion!
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Lessons from My Father by Denis Waitley
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My dad had a keen imagination, and we would often play a little good-night game that became our special ritual. He would come into my room to talk to me and listen to the triumphs and tragedies of my day. As he was leaving, Dad had a way of leaning back against the switch by my door and rubbing against it to "magically" blow out my light like the birthday candles on a cake.
As he did his little routine, Dad would say: "I'm blowing out your light now, and it will be dark for you. In fact, as far as you're concerned, it will be dark all over the world because the only world you ever know is the one you see through your own eyes. So remember, Son, keep your light bright. The world is yours to see that way. I love you, Son. Good night."
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When I was very young, I used to lie there in bed after Dad left and try to understand what he meant. It was confusing to think that the whole world was dark when I was asleep and that the only world I would ever know was the one I would see through my own eyes. What Dad was trying to tell me was that when I went to sleep at night, as far as I was concerned, the world came to a stop. When I woke up in the morning I could choose to see a fresh new world through my own eyes -- if I kept my light bright. In other words, if I woke up happy, the world was happy. If I woke up not feeling well, the world was not as well off.
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My father's guidance about self-perception and the power in the eye of the beholder was invaluable. What he was trying to teach me with his little light show was this: "Denis, everything depends on how you want to look at what happens in life. It doesn't make any difference what is going on 'out there' -- What makes a difference is how you take it."
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Instead of teaching me "my glass was half-empty," my father taught me "my glass was more than half-full." He taught me to view life as something that was continually opening and expanding with new opportunities and events to enjoy.
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Somewhere he picked up a bit of quantum physics theory. Depending on the kind of experiment you conduct, a particle of light can become a light beam or a light wave. It all depends on how you want to examine it. The light can change form, not because of its properties -- it still remains light -- but because of how you choose to behold it. My dad taught me that ugliness or beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Want and abundance are in the eye of the beholder. Being mediocre or being the best depends on the eye of the beholder.
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Those good-night rituals with my father taught me that it didn't make any difference what the other kids said, what the other kids wore, or what they did. Their opinion of me wasn't that important. What was important was the way I handled what they might do and say.
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And the same is true for both you and me today... People's opinions of me isn't what is important, it's the way I handle their opinions and actions that makes the difference.
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"Do what you can with what you have where you are."
Theodore Roosevelt

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

The Major Key to Your Better Future is You by Jim Rohn
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Of all the things that can have an effect on your future, I believe personal growth is the greatest. We can talk about sales growth, profit growth, asset growth, but all of this probably will not happen without personal growth. It’s really the open door to it all. In fact I’d like to have you memorize a most important phrase. Here it is, “The major key to your better future is YOU.”
Let me repeat that. “The major key to your better future is YOU.” Put that someplace you can see it every day, in the bathroom, in the kitchen, at the office, anywhere where you can see it every day. The major key to your better future is YOU. Try to remember that every day you live and think about it. The major key is YOU.
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Now, there are many things that will help your better future. If you belong to a strong, dynamic, progressive company, that would help. If the company has good products, good services that you are proud of, that would certainly help. If there were good sales aids, that would help, good training would certainly help. If there is strong leadership, that will certainly help. All of these things will help, and of course, if it doesn’t storm, that will help. If your car doesn’t break down, that will help. If the kids don’t get sick, that will help. If the neighbors stay halfway civil, that will help. If your relatives don’t bug you, that will help. If it isn’t too cold, if it isn’t too hot, all those things will help your better future. And if prices don’t go much higher and if taxes don’t get much heavier, that will help. And if the economy stays stable, those things will all help. We could go on and on with the list; but remember this, the list of things that I’ve just covered and many more - all put together - play a minor role in your better future.
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The major key to your better future is you. Lock your mind onto that. This is a super important point to remember. The major key is you. A friend of mine has always answered when asked, “How do you develop an above-average income?” He says, “Simple. Become an above-average person. Work on you.” My friend says, “Develop an above-average handshake.” He says, “A lot of people want to be successful, and they don’t even work on their handshake. As easy as that would be to start, they let it slide. They don’t understand.” My friend says, “Develop an above- average smile. Develop an above-average excitement. Develop an above-average dedication. Develop an above-average interest in other people.” He says, “To have more, become more.” Remember; work harder on yourself than you do on your job. For a long time in my life, I didn’t have this figured out.
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Strangely enough, with two different people in the same company one may earn an extra $100 a month, and the other may earn a $1,000. What could possibly be the difference? If the products were the same, if the training was the same, if they both had the same literature, the same tools. If they both had the same teacher, the same compensation plan, if they both attended the same meetings, why would one person earn the $100 per month and the other person earn the $1000?Remember here is the difference...the difference is personal, inside, not outside, inside.
You see the real difference is inside you. In fact, the difference IS you. Someone once said, “The magic is not in the products. The magic is not in the literature. The magic is not in the film. There isn’t a magic meeting, but the magic that makes things better is inside you, and personal growth makes this magic work for you.
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The magic is in believing. The magic is in daring. The magic is in trying. The real magic is in persevering. The magic is in accepting. It’s in working. The magic is in thinking. There is magic in a handshake. There is magic in a smile. There is magic in excitement and determination. There is real magic in compassion and caring and sharing. There is unusual magic in strong feeling and you see, all that comes from inside, not outside. So, the difference is inside you. The real difference is you. You are the major key to your better future.
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Balance Your Workload with a Generous Number of Mini-Vacations for Maximum Productivity by Denis Waitley
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By re-energizing and renewing yourself frequently, you will avoid burnout and become much more motivated and productive. Don’t keep your nose to the grindstone for years and wait for retirement to travel. Balance and consistency are the keys. Enjoy the process, not just the result. Don’t fight the passing of time. Don’t fear it, squander it, or try to hide from it under a superficial cosmetic veil of fads and indulgences. Life and time go together. Do enjoy each phase of life. Do make the most of each day, and draw maximum joy from each moment.
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Many people today are concerned with quality time – time generally defined in part as that spent on recreation, personal pursuits, time with children, spouses and friends. While I certainly believe quality time is important, I believe two other aspects of time are equally important.
First, one must also spend quantity time. The average father spends less than 30 minutes each week in direct one-on-one communication with each of his children. How can we possibly expect good family relationships with so little communication?
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Second, one must spend regular time. Many supervisors and company presidents go for weeks, even months, without seeing many of their employees. There’s no substitute for regular meetings and open forums in which managers and team members can share ideas.
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Time has a dual structure. On one hand, we live our daily routines meeting present contingencies as they arise. On the other hand, our most ambitious goals and desires need time so that they can be assembled and cemented. A long-term goal connects pieces of time into one block. These blocks can be imagined and projected into the future as we do when we set goals for ourselves. Or, these blocks of time can be created in retrospect as we do when we look back at what we’ve accomplished.
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It’s not in the image of our big dreams that we run the risk of losing our focus and motivation. It’s the drudgery and routine of our daily lives that present the greatest danger to our hopes for achievement. Good time management means that you maximize the daily return on the energy and mental effort you expend.
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Ways to maximize your time productivity:
• Write down in one place all the important contacts you have and all of your goals and priorities. Make a back up copy, preferably on CD, DVD or Zip disc. Write down every commitment you make at the time you make it.
• Stop wasting the first hour of your workday. Having the chat and first cup of coffee, reading the paper, and socializing are the three costliest opening exercises that lower productivity.
• Do one thing well at a time. It takes time to start and stop work on each activity. Stay with a task until it is completed.
• Don’t open unimportant mail. More than a fourth of the mail you receive can be tossed before you open or read it, and that includes e-mail.
• Handle each piece of paper only once and never more than twice. Don’t set aside anything without taking action. Carry work, reading material, audiotapes and your laptop computer with you everywhere you go. Convert down time into uplink time.
• Spend twenty minutes at the beginning of each week and ten minutes at the beginning of each day planning your to do list.
• Set aside personal relaxation time during the day. Don’t work during lunch. It’s neither noble nor nutritional to skip important energy input and stress-relieving time. Throughout the day, ask yourself, “What’s the best use of my time right now?” As the day grows short, focus on projects you can least afford to leave undone.
• And as we said at the beginning of this message, take vacations often, mini-vacations of two or three days, and leave your work at home. The harder you work, the more you need to balance your exercise and leisure time.
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Action Idea: Plan a relaxing 3-day vacation within the next three months without taking any business work with you. Reserve it on your calendar this week.
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"Achievement seems to be connected with action. Successful men and women keep moving. They make mistakes, but they don't quit"
Conrad Hilton

Saturday, June 06, 2009

Today I was at Terminal 3, got about 1 hour plus to spare so I walked around the place.

Went to Level 4 to see the SQ planes, in fact nothing much to see cos' the planes I have even see them right in front me before many times.

Then went to Basement 2 again... I was walking towards M1, then I saw there is a some sort of entertainment for me while waiting at T3. And here I goes.... Initially there isn't anyone else, soon after I was standing there a while longer, kids started to gather around and then adults joined in too. It's always the case, you need to be the first one to start it then others will follow you behind. And so I shade all 10 of them, one by one. Some are not done properly so I re-do it again.

Have fun with it. I shade it for momo to play with. Her hair is getting longer now, she needs a decent haircut. The funny thing is she can tell me she wants to cut her hair. Ha!

Thursday, June 04, 2009

Be Like Branson

Richard Branson turns 60 next month and his life seems as golden as his locks. He’s worth about $4.4 billion and he ranked as the 236th richest person last year, according to Forbes. Branson has put his Virgin brand on independent businesses in the airline, rail, space travel, financial, healthcare and beverage industries, to name a few. He’s a humanitarian, environmentalist and an adventurer. Here are some of Branson’s success strategies:
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Have fun. "Any proposal I like must sound fun."
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Take pride in your work. "What really matters is what you create. Does it work or not? Does it make you proud?"
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Stay open to ideas. "Some of the best ideas come out of the blue, and you have to keep an open mind to see their virtue." For instance, Virgin Atlantic’s in-flight massages and manicures began after a tip from his wife’s manicurist.
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Empower and respect. "Inspire people to think like entrepreneurs, and whatever you do, treat them like adults. The hardest taskmaster of all is a person’s own conscience, so the more responsibility you give people, the better they will work for you."
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Pass the torch. "All young people… need someone who can show them a future. They need to be able to work out what they can do with their lives, how they can enjoy their lives, how they can pay for it and how they can take responsibility for their actions. I think it’s a shame that we teach children everything about the world, but we don’t teach them how to take part in the world, how to realize an idea, how to measure the consequences of their actions, how to take a knock, or how to share their success."
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Read this month's cover story, "Virgin Entrepreneur" on Richard Branson.

Wednesday, June 03, 2009

The Two Choices We Face by Jim Rohn
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Each of us has two distinct choices to make about what we will do with our lives. The first choice we can make is to be less than we have the capacity to be. To earn less. To have less. To read less and think less. To try less and discipline ourselves less. These are the choices that lead to an empty life. These are the choices that, once made, lead to a life of constant apprehension instead of a life of wondrous anticipation.
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And the second choice? To do it all! To become all that we can possibly be. To read every book that we possibly can. To earn as much as we possibly can. To give and share as much as we possibly can. To strive and produce and accomplish as much as we possibly can. All of us have the choice.
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To do or not to do. To be or not to be. To be all or to be less or to be nothing at all.
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Like the tree, it would be a worthy challenge for us all to stretch upward and outward to the full measure of our capabilities. Why not do all that we can, every moment that we can, the best that we can, for as long as we can?
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Our ultimate life objective should be to create as much as our talent and ability and desire will permit. To settle for doing less than we could do is to fail in this worthiest of undertakings.
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Results are the best measurement of human progress. Not conversation. Not explanation. Not justification. Results! And if our results are less than our potential suggests that they should be, then we must strive to become more today than we were the day before. The greatest rewards are always reserved for those who bring great value to themselves and the world around them as a result of who and what they have become.
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Why You Must Read Biographies by Ron White
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"Don't worry boy, it will be alright. I've took this road you are walkin' down. I've been in your shoes. It is just somethin' that you have got to go through. I had this same talk with my dad."
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Those were the words I heard from my dad at the age of twelve, when my heart had flushed my eyes with tears because the life of my dog was flickering out. Through the years I have taken walks down the same road with my dad and I've heard different versions of the same speech when business was tough, friendships ended or I wasn't feeling my best.
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Sometimes it is nice to know that what you are going through isn't an experience unique to you. There is comfort in knowing that others have been there and there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Often, when you are in the midst of the tunnel  the only thing that catches your focus is despair, discouragement and depression. Yet, it can turn your day around when someone ventures into the tunnel  walks with you and grabs your hand to say, I've been here & hang in there. I turned out alright and you will as well.’
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Unfortunately, we don't all have someone who will tread into the tunnel and walk beside with encouragement. This is why it is so important to read biographies! A biography is a unique way to have a successful person walk beside you as you examine the story of their life. You will often be surprised that the most successful people of all time experience the same struggles as you.
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Einstein was divorced, Lincoln battled depression, Ronald Reagan had his heart broken by his first wife and Sam Walton went broke twice. Where did I learn these facts? From the biographies I read! Did it make me feel better because they had hard times? Yes and no. I never delight in someone else's pain. On the other hand, it is without question that Einstein, Lincoln, Reagan and Walton were monumental successes. It is refreshing and inspiring to read that they were also human and have walked down the same road that you and I have.
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What an encouragement it was when my business was struggling a few years ago to read Sam Walton's biography and my eyes halted on the page where I read that at the exact age I was at that time that he was in an almost identical financial spot! I put the book down and a smile spread across my face. If you don't know who Sam Walton is, he started a small company called Wal-Mart a few years ago and it turned out okay.
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Reading Sam Walton's biography was a neat way for me to get inspired and reminded that some pretty successful people have met discouragement head on and succeeded. In a sense, while reading that book, a message from the spirit of Sam Walton said, Ron I have been there. It is hard, but don't give up. The reward is worth it. Now press on.’ I did and I will be forever glad that I did.
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Now, go to the bookstore and pick up a biography. By the way, if you are in a rough spot or experiencing some heartache.. "Don't worry boy, it will be alright. I've took this road you are walkin' down. I've been in your shoes. It is just somethin' that you have got to go through. I had this same talk with my dad."
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"Values were meant to be costly. If it doesn't cost much, we probably wouldn't appreciate the value."
Jim Rohn