Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Thoughts on Successful People by Chris Widener
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I was hired to do some training for a sales team from one of the largest companies in America. There were 16 people on this team. That year their sales (for the 16 of them) were close to 250 million - that's right, a quarter of a billion - dollars! Needless to say, it was an excellent and fascinating time. I decided to learn a little bit myself, so I watched them closely to see what kind of people they were and to see what common denominators they shared. Below is what I found. I think you will find the elements applicable to your own life.The first thing I noticed about this successful sales team was that they had a sense of humor! They simply weren't a terribly serious bunch of people. Instead, they saw that life was to be enjoyed and that means they were able to laugh a little bit. Sure, there were varying levels in this but they all had a sense of humor. They were able to laugh at circumstances, and they were able to laugh at themselves. It was quite refreshing and a core element of their success, I'm sure.
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The second thing I found out about this group was that they did not achieve their success through pedigree, but through hard work. They didn't come from families that gave them a free pass into the upper echelon of the corporate world and they didn't get a head start from upper crust universities. What got them to where they are now? Hard work! That's right, another example that if you put your mind to it, work hard and get in the right situation, you can achieve great things! These folks work long hours and are disciplined in the work they do. And it is paying off.
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The third thing I noticed about this team is that they are learners. They were always engaged in the learning process. During my sessions they were engaged and listening. You could see their minds processing the information. They were asking questions and applying the material to their work and their lives. They wanted to improve in any way that they could. It was also interesting to watch them in their team meetings led by their sales manager. They were very interactive and were learning from one another. None of them was above learning from a peer.
What did I see in these successful people? The same things that can make you a success as you apply the principles to your own life: A sense of humor, hard work, and a desire to learn at every turn.
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Chris Widener
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"Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow."
Albert Einstein
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"Learn how to separate the majors and the minors. A lot of people don't do well simply because they major in minor things."
Jim Rohn
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"Don't mistake movement for achievement. It's easy to get faked out by being busy. The question is: Busy doing what?"
Jim Rohn
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"Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending."
Maria Robinson
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Nurturing Your Children in the Form of Roots and Wings
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It is far better to give your children your time and nurturing in the form of Roots and Wings instead of trying to buy their affection with Loot and Things. What do we mean by Roots and Wings? We must have roots in order to grow strong and weather the buffeting winds of unforeseen storms and the challenges of weeds and droughts. These are character traits fundamental to long-term success, regardless of future environmental conditions. By wings, we mean the motivation, goal orientation and optimism to soar and fly, becoming independent, high achieving adults who make a positive difference in life.
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With solid roots, children are prepared to leave their parents' gardens. The planting of the seeds of greatness in kids takes patience and persistence. Character growth is not always immediate or obvious. If, for example, you were to plant the seed of a Chinese bamboo tree, and water and nurture the seed consistently, you could become frustrated and even discouraged, unless you knew the growth cycle of the tree. There is no visible growth the first, second, third, or fourth year. But during the fifth year, the tree will grow about ninety feet in six weeks! Did the tree really wait five years to begin growing? Of course not. The nurturing of the first four years allowed the tree to develop a strong root system which could accommodate the tremendous, visible growth that fifth year.
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It is often the same in raising children. Values and character traits are not instilled overnight or by preaching. They are formed over time through modeling and repetition. Values are more often caught, than taught. Although we don't often see the immediate consequences or rewards of the thoughts planted in our children's minds, in due time, they will reap what has been sown.
Invest in your children's lives by taking the thought, time and nurturing to give them Roots and Wings that allow them to soar in life!
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-- Denis Waitley

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